TS6: Summative Assessment

February 15, 2019 2:17 pm

We recently had summative assessment training.

  • The role of the Teaching Standards Agency:

The teaching standards agency create the documents focused on education from the foundation stage to KS2 (such as the National Curriculum). They also provide information for schools about teacher assessment frameworks, reporting and how to moderate. The statutory expectations are:

  • EYFS: Progress check at age 2, reception baseline – end of year (ELGs)
  • Year 1 – Phonics Screening Check
  • Year 2 – End of KS1 teacher assessments.
  • Year 4 – Multiplication Tables Check (2020)
  • Year 6 – End of KS2 teacher assessments.

TS6A: know and understand how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements

  • The importance of assessment data before the beginning of the academic year:

Knowing what the children’s data represents moving into a new academic year is essential for setting targets. If the children are not on track for age related expectations (ARE) then tracking data will not show sufficient progress summatively, regardless of the ‘actual’ progress they have made. Using data from the previous key stage will allow sufficient targets to be set, but it must be realistic and accurate – this creates opportunity when identifying target groups, gaps in the curriculum and to exclude barriers to learning.

TS6C: use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons

  • Knowing the statutory expectations:

The statutory expectations for foundation stage are: emerging, expected, exceeding, GLD X5 areas. The KS1 & 2 statutory expectations are: P-scales, pre KS, working towards, expected and greater depth. Age-related expectations are: Below year group (AREs), beginning, developing, secure. These expectations allow schools to track the progress of pupils’ summatively and therefore cater for the data produced by the end of each academic year (ASP – Analyse School Performance), IDSR (Inspection Data Summary Report). TS6A: know and understand how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements

  • The different methods of assessment and how they relate to data:

There are various methods of teacher assessment that a school can use to assess the data of their class/whole school.

  • School agreed assessment criteria – O Track or other database tracking methodologies. This tracks the termly progress of children, data can easily be compared to identify how much progress they have made, if any at all. Interventions can then be formed to ensure the child is back on track. This data is used for pupil progress reports. TS6C: use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons
  • Evidence from work – Although children may not summatively achieve their ‘ARE’, evidence can be collected throughout the year to detail the progress they have made. This is demonstrated in books, feedback and cross curriculum activities where skills have been transferred (e.g reading/writing). TS6B: make use of formative and summative assessment to secure pupils’ progress.

 

  • Consistency of assessment and maintaining accuracy:

Moderation and staff training are two main areas that the school use to maintain the consistency of assessment and data. Moderation is organised with subject leads, partnered schools and the deputy/headteacher to ensure that work is tailored at the ‘ARE’ and that work is accessible (differentiated) for all learners. Partnered schools will bring in their childrens books at a ‘graded standard’ and compare the work with ours who we assess at a similar standard. This way we can use our assessment tool against theirs to ensure that judgement is correct.

Moving forwards, understanding the general overview of assessment is significant to the children’s learning as without knowing how to access or use data successfully will lead to problems presently and certainly in the following academic year.

Focused next steps to impact on your progress or the progress of the children in your care:

  • To input data into O-track and understand how my school supports assessment for children.